Founded in 1930, Architectural Design [insert AD logo] is an influential and prestigious publication. It combines the currency and topicality of a newsstand journal with the rigor and production qualities of a book. With an almost unrivalled reputation worldwide, it is consistently at the forefront of cultural though and design.

Each title of AD is edited by an invited guest-editor, who is an international expert in the field. Renowned for being at the leading edge of design and new technologies, AD also covers themes as diverse as architectural history, the environment, interior design, landscape architecture and urban design.

Provocative and inspirational, AD inspires theoretical, creative and technological advances. It questions the outcome of technical innovations a swell as the far-reaching social, cultural and environmental challenges that present themselves today.

Consistently at the forefront of cultural thought and design since the 1960s, it has time and again proved provocative and inspirational – inspiring theoretical, creative and technological advances.

Prominent in the 1980s and 1990s for the part it played in Postmodernism and then in Deconstruction, in the 2000s AD has leveraged a depth and level of scrutiny not currently offered elsewhere in the design press. Topics pursued question the outcomes of technical innovations as well as the far-reaching social, cultural and environmental challenges that present themselves today
in a period of increasing global uncertainty.

AD Timeline

AD in the 30’s – 40’s

November 1930: 3 architects started a ‘building centre’ in a basement at 26 Bloomsbury Way, London. This was superseded by a printed publication that resulted in the Architect’s Standard Catalogue. Given away free to 4,000 architectural practices, each page was paid for with advertising.

1932: The Architect’s Standard Catalogue was bought with another journal called Architectural Design & Construction. FE Towndrow became the Editor. AD&C now included descriptions of the latest buildings, news features on professional topics, and reviews of new materials and building methods, as well as articles of aesthetic or scholarly interest.

1942: Monica Pidgeon, AD’s, most influential editor (1946-75), began editing AD&C when Towndrow became Director of the Ministry of Works during the War.

1946: the magazine was renamed Architectural Design under Pidgeon.

AD in the 50’s – 60’s

After the war, Pidgeon intentionally aimed AD at young architects and students. It included features on art and new buildings alongside more practical technical articles, such as brick dimension tables and a series of basic introductory pieces on drainage and plumbing. By the mid to late 50s with Crosby as technical editor, it was, though, establishing itself as an experimental publication: the promoter of architects and writers who did not fit with the national Contemporary style, advocated by the LCC Housing Dept and the RIBA. It published those such as Team X (the Smithsons) and Goldfinger. It also became highly international, Pidgeon was involved with the organisation of the CIAM conferences and she created a network of contributors from around
the world.

1953-1962: Theo Crosby joined Pidgeon as AD’s technical editor. A founding member of Pentagram, he designed the colourful covers for which it became famous and established it as a highly visual magazine.

In 1956, Crosby was responsible for organising the ‘This is Tomorrow’ exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery in east London for which he organised for artists and architects to work together in groups.

1962-4: Kenneth Frampton was technical editor. Pidgeon describes him as introducing ‘more serious and critical writing’.

1965-72: Robin Middleton was technical editor.

End of 1960s: Adrian George became art editor and designed the distinctive AD logo on which the current logo is still based. It gave the magazine its powerful identity.

AD in the late 60’s and early 70’s

AD became synonymous with the futuristic ideas of Archigram and Cedric Price, with Price editing the seminal Cosmorama section. Its densely written scrapbook-like pages enthused over the ideas of the future – energy, space travel, communications and computer technology.

1969-73: Peter Murray joined the magazine as assistant art editor and then technical editor when Middleton left.

1975: Monica Pidgeon left AD to become Editor of the RIBA Journal.

1975: Martin Spring took over as Editor with Haig Beck as Assistant Editor.

AD in the late 70s and 80s

Under the ownership of Andreas Papadakis, Charles Jencks became an important influence on the editorial direction of AD, writing and editing issues but also proposing themes, architects and contributors.

In 1977, Papadakis published Jencks’s bestselling book Language of Post-Modern Architecture and produced the first issue of AD on Post-Modernism. Between 1977 and 1985, AD was largely focused on Post-Modernism though issues on the theme stretched
on to 1991 with Post-Modernism on Trial and Post-Modern Triumphs in London (1991).

Assuming a new glossy format, AD no longer relied on advertising revenue and was sold as a book and on subscription. Papadakis raised the profile of AD internationally by holding events in London to which he invited the newly emerging architectural stars.
This put the magazine at the centre of debates in architecture, covering every mutation of style and trend, most notably Postmodernism, Classicism and Deconstruction. Most notable among the classicists were Dimitri Porphyrios and Leon Krier.
AD produced 3 issues on Deconstruction in the late 80s/early 90s.

The emphasis on ‘plurality’ also allowed for strong historical issues in this period with Gavin Stamp – Britain in the Thirties and Edwardian London – and Catherine Cooke writing on the Russian avant-garde, tying into the interest
in Constructivism/Deconstruction.

1977: Andreas Papadakis took over as Publisher and then as Editor in 1979 when Haig Beck left.

AD in the mid and late 90s

In 1992, AD took on a large black glossy format that expressed the enthusiasm for the architectural image. The first ‘digital’ issues were published in this period with Greg Lynn’s classic issue Folding in Architecture of 1993, followed by Neil Spiller’s Cyberspace issues and Stephen Perella’s Hypersurface.

1991: Andreas Papadakis sold his publishing company, Academy Editions, to VCH, a German scientific publisher.

1993: Maggie Toy became Editor.

1997: AD and the Academy architecture list came to John Wiley & Sons when it acquired VCH. Maggie Toy continued as Editor.

1999: Helen Castle joined John Wiley & Sons as Managing Editor of AD and became Editor in 2001.

Consultant Editor – Helen Castle
Helen is Consultant Editor for Architectural Design (AD). She has over 25 years of publishing experience on architecture publications. She had her first job as a graduate on AD in the early 90s before working for other publishers and coming back to AD in 1999 to work for Wiley. She has a BA in History of Art and Architecture from the University of East Anglia and a Masters in Architectural History from the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL.

Digital Editor – Terri Peters

Managing Editor (Freelance) – Caroline Ellerby

Production Editor – Elizabeth Gongde

Art Direction and Design – Christian Küsters of CHK Design

Prepress – Artmedia, London

Associate Marketing Director – Justin Mayhew

Press and Publicity – Penny Smith

Publisher – Paul Sayer

Editorial Board

  • Will Alsop
  • Denise Bratton
  • Paul Brislin
  • Mark Burry
  • Helen Castle
  • André Chaszar
  • Nigel Coates
  • Peter Cook
  • Teddy Cruz
  • Max Fordham
  • Massimiliano Fuksas
  • Kate Goodwin
  • Edwin Heathcote
  • Anthony Hunt
  • Charles Jencks
  • Bob Maxwell
  • Jayne Merkel
  • Kester Rattenbury
  • Mark Robbins
  • Deborah Saunt
  • Coren Sharples
  • Leon van Schaik
  • Patrik Schumacher
  • Neil Spiller
  • Claire Weisz
  • Ken Yeang
  • Alejandro Zaera-Polo

Consultant Editor – Helen Castle

Publisher – Paul Sayer

Managing Editor (Freelance) – Caroline Ellerby

Art Direction and Design – CHK Designs: Christian Küsters and Hannah Dumphy

 

We are very proud to have the following members on the AD Board:

  • Will Alsop
  • Denise Bratton
  • Paul Brislin
  • Mark Burry
  • André Chaszar
  • Nigel Coates
  • Peter Cook
  • Teddy Cruz
  • Max Fordham
  • Massimiliano Fuksas
  • Edwin Heathcote
  • Michael Hensel
  • Anthony Hunt
  • Charles Jencks
  • Bob Maxwell
  • Jayne Merkel
  • Mark Robbins
  • Deborah Saunt
  • Leon van Schaik
  • Patrik Schumacher
  • Neil Spiller
  • Michael Weinstock
  • Ken Yeang
  • Alejandro Zaera-Polo

Where can I buy AD?
AD is currently stocked by:

Riba
www.architecture.com

Amazon
www.amazon.co.uk

AA Bookshop
http://bookshop.aaschool.ac.uk/

The Book Depository
www.bookdepository.co.uk

Waterstones
www.waterstones.co.uk

Archi Tegn Arkitekturboghandel, Aarhus, Denmark
http://architegn.dk/

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